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Kemmelmeier (2008) Personality and Indiviudal Differences, Study 1

Data for Kemmelmeier 2008 PAID Study 1--public.dta (1.6MB)

February 5, 2015 (1:20 pm EST)

Study 1 data set, Stata format. (The origin of the data, i.e. the university where it was collected, cannot be disclosed)


Details

Is there a relationship between political orientation and cognitive ability?: A test of three hypotheses in two studies

Markus Kemmelmeier, University of Nevada

Numeric/quantitative (rating scales, checkboxes, etc.)

Stata

Multi-State Area, United States

July 1, 1997, throughJune 30, 2001

Self-report questionnaire & standardized test scores (archival)

Full population

Approved by IRB or ethics board

  • Education
  • Psychology
    • Personality/Individual differences
    • Political psychology
    • Social psychology
  • Sociology

This series of studies tested one linear and two curvilinear hypotheses concerning the relationship between political conservatism-liberalism and cognitive ability. Study 1, focusing on students at a U.S. elite university (n = 7279), found support for the idea that higher conservatism was linked to lower verbal ability. There was also strong support for political extremists on the left and right being higher in verbal ability than centrists. Study 2 employed aggregate data pertaining to the 50 U.S. states and demonstrated that conservatism was linked to lower cognitive ability in states with high political involvement, but found conservatism to be correlated with higher average ability in states wit low political involvement. The discussion addresses potential practical implications and criticism of this research, and highlights the need to better understand the replicable finding that higher conservatism is sometimes linked to higher cognitive ability.

CONSERVATISM, POLITICAL ORIENTATION, COGNITIVE ABILITY, INTELLIGENCE, POLITICAL INVOLVEMENT

Kemmelmeier, M. (2008). Is there a relationship between political orientation and cognitive ability?: A test of three hypotheses in two studies. Personality and Individual Differences, 45, 767-772.